New Study Calculates Contribution of Smoking, Poor Diet, Obesity, and Other Modifiable Risk Factors to Cancer in the United States: Four in ten cancer cases & deaths linked to modifiable risk factors!
“November 21, 2017–  A new American Cancer Society study calculates the contribution of several modifiable risk factors to cancer occurrence, expanding and clarifying the role of known risk factors, from smoking to low consumption of fruits and vegetables. The study finds more than four in ten cancer cases and deaths in the United States are associated with these major modifiable risk factors, many of which can be mitigated with prevention strategies. The study appears early online in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians….

Other selected findings from the report:

  • Smoking accounted for 81.7% of lung cancers, 73.8% of larynx cancers, 50% of esophageal cancers, and 46.9% of bladder cancers.
  • Excess body weight was associated with 60.3% of uterine cancers, about one-third of liver cancers (33.9%), 11.3% of breast cancers in women, and 5.2% of colorectal cancers.
  • Alcohol intake was associated with almost one-half of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers in men (46.3%) and about one-fourth (27.4%) in women, 24.8% of liver cancers in men and 11.9% in women, 17.1% of colorectal cancers in men and 8.1% in women, and 16.4% of breast cancers in women.
  • UV radiation was associated with 96.0% of melanomas of the skin in men and 93.7% in women.
  • Physical inactivity accounted for 26.7% of uterine cancers, 16.3% of colorectal cancers, and 3.9% of female breast cancers.
  • Low fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with 17.6% of oral cavity/pharyngeal cancers, 17.4% of laryngeal cancers, and 8.9% of lung cancers.
  • Red and processed meat consumption accounted for 5.4% and 8.2% of colorectal cancers, respectively. Low dietary fiber accounted for 10.3% of colorectal cancer cases, while low dietary calcium accounted for 4.9% of cases.”

To see the full article, go to the American Cancer Society’s Website!